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Enjoying Aged White Wine & Pierre Morey 2011 Bourgogne Aligoté

27 Feb

Let me start with a wine review: 
Pierre Morey, 2011 Bourgogne Aligoté, Meursalt, Cote D’Or, France. 12% ABV; Case purchase in 2013 for $17/bottle.

At nine years of age, the color has only slightly deepened to a maturing pale gold. Aroma is light and mellow, reductive of dried wildflowers and lemon zest. On the palate, the fruit is restrained to delicate pear and apple with secondary notes of  lemon-lime and brioche, tiny hints of flint and chalk on the long finish. I recall how much fervor and brightness was in the glass upon my initial bottle; what a wonder it is to be able to enjoy this now. Matured and possibly past prime, but thoroughly enjoyable, thankfully. And remembering the price I paid for this, how happy I am to enjoy the last few drops.


Copyright 2020 by Jim van Bergen, JvBUnCorked

And now for the commentary: 

Aged white wines.

It’s a dangerous topic. People have VERY strong opinions about it. And those opinions are right- because just about everyone has been burned at one time or another.

Once bitten, twice shy. I will admit to purchasing wines and holding them too long. I will also admit to purchasing aged whites considered “to be in their prime drinking window” at auction, and received them to find they were all far past that window. When, years later, I finally wrote about that experience, I had people reach out privately to confirm doing the same. Auctions are riskier than buying direct from a wine store, as there is no refund. At least with a corked bottle from a wine store, you might have recourse with your seller; not so with an auction. Along with my wine treasures, I also keep a flawed bottle with a note on it: a reminder of buying faulted wine at auction, as a warning not to make the same mistake twice.

Yet, I still love aged white wines. I love thinking of the time and place. I love how delicate these wines are. I love remembering when I purchased the bottle, and the first time I opened a bottle. The I recall the most recent time. These white wines are far less pliable than their red counterparts, but I adore their delicate nature, the shifts in flavor, the maturity the wine shows. Any bottle with age is a special treat to me.

So why all the worry? One reason is that many white Burgundy lovers want to store their beloved white Bourgogne, and it’s risky, because of premox.

‘Premox’ is short for Premature Oxidation. This is a fault in which age-worthy white wines were found to be prematurely oxidized to the point of being undrinkable. The phenomenon tainted a slew of Burgundian whites since the 1990 vintages. Other oenophiles have experienced this from time to time in recent vintages as well, so that social awareness has come to dictate: Enjoy while the wine is still in its prime.  Bill Nanson of The Burgundy Report  put it simply: Don’t Save White Burgundy. He writes:
since the mid-1990s, white burgundy has been produced with a propensity to self-destruct anywhere between 4 and 10 years from vintage – whilst in their bottles, whilst in their cases, whilst in the best of cellars – I have to regard all white burgundy from all producers as potentially unable to reach maturity.”

So. Caveat Emptor: Let the buyer beware. 

And which wines CAN you age for a decade, and enjoy with friends who might not be as educated to truly appreciate the wine?

-Bordeaux Blanc, white blends from Classic Chateaux can be magical. The fruit recedes and leaves a savory delight in its wake.

-Rioja Blanco, a blend of Spanish grapes Viura (90%), and Malvasía (10%).

-Sauternes, Banyuls, Tokaji, and Vin de Paille (straw wine): dessert wines with a high sugar content.

-Fortified wines: Macvin du Jura, Madeira. The oldest wine I have tasted was an 1859 Madeira. It was a magical experience.

-Riesling: the sugars and acidity allow these wines tremendous aging potential.

-Hermitage whites: Rousanne and Marsanne wines from this region in France are often aged 10-15 years

-From the Jura, historic wines made in ancient methods: vin jaune and macvin (fortified) are capable of aging for eons. Granted, they are also largely suggested for a highly  experienced wine palate.

And of course, Burgundian Chardonnay, if you are willing to take the risk. (See PreMox, above). Personally, I AM willing to take the risk. Because what is life, without a few risks? I’ve lost before, but when the wines are amazing, it’s totally worth the risk, to me.

Below are a few of the aged white wines I’ve had in the last year. #WIYG What’s In Your Glass? 

All Images protected by Copyright and not to be use without permission.
Copyright 2020 by Jim van Bergen, JvBUnCorked

 


 

All Images protected by Copyright and not to be use without permission.
Copyright 2020 by Jim van Bergen, JvBUnCorked

 

All Images protected by Copyright and not to be use without permission.
Copyright 2020 by Jim van Bergen, JvBUnCorked

 

 

All Images protected by Copyright and not to be use without permission.
Copyright 2020 by Jim van Bergen, JvBUnCorked

 

 

 

à votre santé!!

 

The Dry White Wine You Still Need: Patricius Tokaj

22 Oct

Patricius 2015 Tokaj Furmint; Hungary. 12%ABV,  average $15/ bottle, street.

Color is warm straw, nose of sweet hibiscus and orchid. On the palate, white peach and pear, dry on the palate but sweet on the nose. A solid mouthfeel that matches well with fish, fowl or pork; and one that paired beautifully with an entree of chicken grilled with peaches and arugula.

 

 

Patricius 2015 Tokaj Yellow Muscat; Hungary. 11.5% ABV, average $15/bottle, street.

Color is pale goldenrod, while the nose offers honeyed citrus: a melange of pineapple,  starfruit, and lemon-lime. On the palate rises gently sweet citrus with mouth-filling acidity; Amalfi lemon and lime zest with a floral aftertaste. I first tried this wine with a trio of cheeses (an easy home run), before pairing with the big world flavors of spices: Indian, Chinese, Thai, and Mexican. The dry muscat held its ground, cleansing the palate with dexterity, verve, and plenty of acid. This and the furmint would also both pair beautifully with seafood of all types; I’d be the first one to toss a cold mixed case of these wines in the trunk on the way to an oyster roast.

 

 

I was surprised by these bottles. I first opened them, ready to taste and take notes, but instead I tasted and got comfortable. I enjoyed them, I stopped thinking about the wine and just enjoyed where they took me. This is no monster chardonnay or classic Sauvignon blanc, but as delicate and specific furmint and muscat, they are beautiful wines that you can and will enjoy on their own. It simply goes to further their appreciation that they are capable of complementing almost any food you pair them with. In the $15 and under range, these wines offer a tremendous value and a surprisingly collaborative flavor palate to match worldwide cuisine.

 

 

So why are Tokaj-region white wines something you need in your cellar? Because only by putting these in your mouth and having them in your wine vocabulary can you use them. I think of the first time I tasted a sublime Bordeaux blend, a grüner veltliner, a viognier, a South African chenin blanc, a sancerre, a pinotage. Shall I go on? Add Tokaj furmint and muscat to your repertoire, and expand your palate, your menu, and your mind. And don’t forget to invite me over to taste your pairing!

 

 

If I owned a club or a restaurant, I’d be trying these wines out as my “house white” to see which drinkers who never go outside of California or France would be bewitched by the Hungarian beauty of Tokaj. Challenge, anyone?

 

 

à votre santé!

 

 

 

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